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IoT for Consumer Retail – List of Top Companies & Solutions

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We’ve compiled a list some of the most prominent companies providing IoT solutions to consumer retailer brands.

 Let’s take a look:

 1. Qliktag

Qliktag IoT Connected Smart Products Platform allows brands and manufactures to assign a QLIKTAG or internet identifier to everyday consumer products and allows them to participate in the Internet of Things.  Enabling products to maintain a digital twin of themselves on the internet, which can be written to or read from using sensors on packaging and also with directly connected devices such as smartphones, barcode scanners, RFID scanners and more, expands the scope of IoT to a whole range of smarter retail and consumer applications such as personalized customer experiences, smart packaging & labelling, product recall management, reordering actions and much more.

 

 

2. Evrythng

Evrythng offers smart products platform and IoT services for consumer goods. Their Product Management and Data Management features allow retailers to maintain digital identities and real-time data to drive IoT applications and give consumer products a digital life.

 

 

 

 

3. ThinFilm NC Solutions 

Thinfilm NFC mobile marketing solutions allow brands to enable digital experiences with the help of smartphones. Its NFC open sensors technology or ‘smart tags’ offer end-to-end marketing solutions for brands and retailers.  Moreover, Thinfilm’s Product Authentication software offers global anti-counterfeit protections and product diversion detection.

 

 

 

4. Gimbal

Gimbal provides mobile marketing and advertising solutions to brands and retailers with the help of technology like location SDKs, geofences and beacons. Moreover, the Gimbal location management platform helps retailers maximize their mobile strategy and enhance the customer experience in real-time.

 

 

 

 

5. Kaa Projects

Kaa is an IoT middleware technology applicable for enterprise IoT development. It provides a range of features that allow developers to build advanced applications for smart products, flexibly manage their device ecosystems, orchestrate end-to-end data processing, and many more.

 

 

 

6. Wise Shelf 

Wise Shelf helps retailers optimize their in-store inventory and data by making regular shelves ‘wise’. These wise shelves are equipped with light sensors that immediately send data to management indicating restocking of the particular product when stock levels go down. The LEDs and sensors allow the physical shelves to participate in the Internet of Things. The platform is great for managing inventory and real-time store data improving supplier visibility while enhancing the customer experience.

 

7. Swirl 

Swirl is a mobile presence management and marketing platform for retailers. Using geofencing, WiFi and BLE, Swirl helps retailers to create unique digital maps for shoppers’ physical journey. This is done using a variety of location “signals” including GPS and geofences for outdoor locations like parking lots, malls, parks etc, and using WiFi and BLE  for indoor locations such as retail stores.

 

 

 

8. Memomi

Memomi’s digital imaging software platform enables retailers to deploy interactive mirrors in stores. The technology uses cameras and smart mirrors to deliver a futuristic in-store shopping experience to customers. Using simple body gestures and smartphones, customers can virtually try on clothes, change colours and even get a 360 view of your outfit, all in real time, eliminating the dilemma of running back and forth from the trial room.  

 

 

9. Authentic or Not

Authentic or Not builds microchips for apparel and fashion brands to help them participate in the IoT. By embedding their microchips in apparel and other merchandising brands, Authentic or Not claims to bridge the gap between technology and fashion. Consumers can hover a smartphone in front of microchips-embedded clothes to verify their authenticity. Their solutions can also be used for anti-counterfeit checks, logistics management and even for upselling products.

 

 

10. Queuehop  

Queuehop provides retailers with smart ‘anti-theft tags’ that brands can use to augment customers’ shopping experience. Consumers can pay for the products using Queuehop’s in-store kiosk or a smartphone. Once the payment is complete, customers can unlock the tag and simply walk-out.  A DIY approach to finding clothes, payment and self-checkout, the patent fashion technology helps customer hop those long queues with faster checkouts.

posted Jul 12 by Sarang Pharate

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+1 vote

We’ve compiled a list some of the most prominent companies providing IoT solutions to consumer retailer brands.

 Let’s take a look:

 1. Qliktag

Qliktag IoT Connected Smart Products Platform allows brands and manufactures to assign a QLIKTAG or internet identifier to everyday consumer products and allows them to participate in the Internet of Things.  Enabling products to maintain a digital twin of themselves on the internet, which can be written to or read from using sensors on packaging and also with directly connected devices such as smartphones, barcode scanners, RFID scanners and more, expands the scope of IoT to a whole range of smarter retail and consumer applications such as personalized customer experiences, smart packaging & labelling, product recall management, reordering actions and much more.

 

 

2. Evrythng

Evrythng offers smart products platform and IoT services for consumer goods. Their Product Management and Data Management features allow retailers to maintain digital identities and real-time data to drive IoT applications and give consumer products a digital life.

 

 

 

 

3. ThinFilm NC Solutions 

Thinfilm NFC mobile marketing solutions allow brands to enable digital experiences with the help of smartphones. Its NFC open sensors technology or ‘smart tags’ offer end-to-end marketing solutions for brands and retailers.  Moreover, Thinfilm’s Product Authentication software offers global anti-counterfeit protections and product diversion detection.

 

 

 

4. Gimbal

Gimbal provides mobile marketing and advertising solutions to brands and retailers with the help of technology like location SDKs, geofences and beacons. Moreover, the Gimbal location management platform helps retailers maximize their mobile strategy and enhance the customer experience in real-time.

 

 

 

 

5. Kaa Projects

Kaa is an IoT middleware technology applicable for enterprise IoT development. It provides a range of features that allow developers to build advanced applications for smart products, flexibly manage their device ecosystems, orchestrate end-to-end data processing, and many more.

 

 

 

6. Wise Shelf 

Wise Shelf helps retailers optimize their in-store inventory and data by making regular shelves ‘wise’. These wise shelves are equipped with light sensors that immediately send data to management indicating restocking of the particular product when stock levels go down. The LEDs and sensors allow the physical shelves to participate in the Internet of Things. The platform is great for managing inventory and real-time store data improving supplier visibility while enhancing the customer experience.

 

7. Swirl 

Swirl is a mobile presence management and marketing platform for retailers. Using geofencing, WiFi and BLE, Swirl helps retailers to create unique digital maps for shoppers’ physical journey. This is done using a variety of location “signals” including GPS and geofences for outdoor locations like parking lots, malls, parks etc, and using WiFi and BLE  for indoor locations such as retail stores.

 

 

 

8. Memomi

Memomi’s digital imaging software platform enables retailers to deploy interactive mirrors in stores. The technology uses cameras and smart mirrors to deliver a futuristic in-store shopping experience to customers. Using simple body gestures and smartphones, customers can virtually try on clothes, change colours and even get a 360 view of your outfit, all in real time, eliminating the dilemma of running back and forth from the trial room.  

 

 

9. Authentic or Not

Authentic or Not builds microchips for apparel and fashion brands to help them participate in the IoT. By embedding their microchips in apparel and other merchandising brands, Authentic or Not claims to bridge the gap between technology and fashion. Consumers can hover a smartphone in front of microchips-embedded clothes to verify their authenticity. Their solutions can also be used for anti-counterfeit checks, logistics management and even for upselling products.

 

 

10. Queuehop  

Queuehop provides retailers with smart ‘anti-theft tags’ that brands can use to augment customers’ shopping experience. Consumers can pay for the products using Queuehop’s in-store kiosk or a smartphone. Once the payment is complete, customers can unlock the tag and simply walk-out.  A DIY approach to finding clothes, payment and self-checkout, the patent fashion technology helps customer hop those long queues with faster checkouts.

0 votes

The entire global supply chain is evolving rapidly with regards to technology.

Gartner forecasts that over 20.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide by 2020. Moreover, Gartner further predicts that more than half of major new business processes will incorporate some element of IoT.

Supply chain ecosystems are one of the biggest beneficiaries of the IoT applications.

Logistic providers that move objects by air, sea, rail, or ground, have widely distributed networks and rely on rapid information about those networks to make decisions. These sectors have especially capitalized on the benefits of an emerging IoT market of connected things and products

IoT Enabled Logistics Solutions can help tackle Mass Global Spoilage & Waste.

Managing logistics is a challenge in itself, given the vulnerability of the shipments on the sea, land and air. To add to these challenges, there are tons of products being shipped all across the global economy, every day, a lot of which comprises of food items, flowers and other products prone to spoilage if not transported under special conditions and temperatures.

The ability to tag boxes, crates, palettes, trucks and containers with IoT track and trace IDs and equip them with temperature sensors, heat sensors and location sensors can offer solutions to a multi-million-dollar inefficiency in the global supply chain caused by spoilage and waste.

Imagine hundreds of cold storage trucks shipping food products between an inland warehouse and a port near the sea. With the use of IoT connected temperature sensors within those trucks, a company can gain instant visibility into not just the location of their trucks but alerts when the temperate spikes within a certain cold storage truck which makes it susceptible to spoilage.

This level of visibility and data insights can help the company flag the truck to report to the nearest service centre to have the issue checked before the entire load is spoiled and has to be written off. The same concept applied to a ship full of hundreds of cold storage containers will allow the organization to locate a specific container on a specific ship and have the crew address the faulty storage container on board before it’s written off as waste. On a global scale, these technologies translate into millions of dollars of product that would otherwise be waste and not reach the intended destination.

How Maersk Addressed Perishable Waste Reduction with IoT Technology

The Munich Maersk has been termed as a testament to the marriage of information and technology. The Maersk Line has been heading towards digitization for a while now. In 2015, Maersk teamed up with AT&T to track and monitor cold shipping containers. AT&T’s IoT technology allows Maersk to track and monitor the condition of refrigerated containers with perishable goods.

Prior to this development, Maersk supply chain managers would manually check each container for spoilage.

Now, Maersk has connected over 280,000 of its refrigerated containers to the AT&T network. Each unit uses a remote container device (RCD) with a 3G High-Temperature SIM card, a GPS unit, a ZigBee radio and antenna, and multiple interfaces for connecting into the refrigerated container’s controller. The RCD can operate with two-way connectivity from just about anywhere in the world.

Maersk’s shipping supervisors now only have to monitor mechanical performance to help ensure the equipment is in proper working condition. This has not only made shipment logistics more transparent and easy to track, it allows Maersk to cut back on costs while allocating fewer supervising managers per ship.

Such real-time visibility makes the supply-chain more transparent and eligible to mitigate risks and track perishable products ahead of time.

By allocating identifiers to every ship, container, and product at a batch or an individual level, similar solutions can be deployed to other water, air or land borne global supply chains to mitigate spoilage and effectively manage shipments.

Maersk Line is only one example of how IoT based models make shipping and logistics more transparent and flexible while mitigating spoilage of shipments in the supply-chain. The implications of IoT Platforms on logistics and supply chain is poised to be game-changing.

 

     

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Buying behavior is changing.

Consumers are far more conscious of what they buy, what they eat, what they put on their bodies and how their purchases impact the environment and others.

Today’s consumers are increasingly becoming cautious with their shopping decisions, wanting to know more and more about the products they consume. They are actively looking at packaging labels that tell a healthy or sustainable story. And brands are expected to communicate the information they’re seeking.

Consumers are not just curious about the ingredients on the packaging, but also, where they come from.

So, What Exactly Are Consumers Looking For?

When a customer picks up a product today and browses through its packaging, what exactly are they looking for beyond the obvious? Let’s take a look

What is Inside this Product?

Consumers don’t want just a list of ingredients on their products, they want to know where those ingredients come from, what they are and whether those ingredients are safe, healthy, and sustainable. For example, there is a large section of consumers avoiding the use of palm oil since they’re aware of the environmental damage the palm oil industry has contributed to.

Consumers are aware of certain kinds of fish which are endangered by overfishing or contain high levels of mercury if they are from certain catch zones. They look for what kind of sweeteners are in their products and whether those sweeteners can have a health impact among scores of other red flags related to ingredients.

Where Did This Come From?

As opposed to reading a list of ingredients, consumers want detailed information on what makes the products they buy and what impact it has on their bodies and the environment. They are looking for traceability information. They want information about its origin and visibility into the supply chain. Consumers are now seeking answers to where their product comes from? They want to know the journey it took to reach the shelves and their homes. What kind of a footprint did this product leave on its journey?

Did This Product Hurt Anyone or Anything Along the Way?

Given the times we live in, it is imperative to ask, what countries was it produced in, do they have fair practices in those places? Consumers are enquiring whether the products they are buying were produced using ethical manufacturing practices or was it made using sweat labor or forced labor in another part of the world? Consumers are aware of illegal cross-country trade and practices. They are aware of the implication of furniture built from wood that was illegally chopped down.

Is this organic?

More than a right to know, consumers need to know whether the product they are paying for contains toxins? Whether it is genetically modified or organic? Consumers want to know whether they are ingesting pesticides through their purchased products. They need to be aware of these toxins and then make an informed decision whether they would like to invest their money in that product. Specially toxins like mercury and lead. More consumers are now concerned about added preservatives or avoiding products with high levels of fluoride. For instance, avoiding meat loaded with antibiotics. Consumers are aware of microplastic particles that exist in toothpaste and other cosmetics and the environmental impact of these. They tend to skip these products altogether.

How Did this Impact the Environment?

Awareness of single-use plastic, packaging and the impact on nature is growing like never before. With efforts from communities, organizations, and individuals, people are becoming aware of the horrors of single-use plastic. According to LA Times, half a billion straws are used every day. Refusing straws is becoming a trending practice all over the world. Moreover, people are avoiding single-use plastic altogether and opting for jute, paper or cloth bags for their grocery shopping.

Today’s consumers have heightened sense of cautiousness when it comes to consumption patterns and their subsequent impact on the ecosystem. Environmental concerns have an impact on the consumer’s purchasing decision. Most consumers wonder whether the product is safe for the environment and their health? How does it contribute to climate change and the global carbon footprint?

These are just some of the big issues that a lot of consumers know about now and subconsciously or consciously process when they pick up a product.

Moreover, the world is warming up to the idea of mindful consumption habits that are born out of ethical practices, transparency, and accountability. Consumers are looking for way more information than those in the last few generations. As traditional product labeling in print has restrictions as well as limitations to meet this growing need for more detailed product information, it is time for brands to think how well they can communicate their stories to the customer about their products and efforts in meeting consumer expectations.

Several organizations and brands have taken commendable steps with their products by either consciously replacing an ingredient, changed sourcing for an ethical reason, made efforts to reduce their organizational footprint or packaging.

The question that remains – “Are we effective as a brand in delivering that information to the consumer at the point they are asking these questions?”

As traditional product labeling in print has restrictions as well as limitations to meet this growing need for more detailed product information, it is time for brands to leverage smart connected products to communicate their stories to the customer about their products and efforts in meeting consumer expectations.

0 votes

Every day, more and more devices are being connected to the Internet.

According to Statista, the global internet of things market is projected to be valued at more than 1.7 trillion US dollars by 2019, with the global connected devices forecast to reach 20.35 billion the same year. Moreover, Navigant Research projects the global smart waste collection technology to grow over 223 million US dollars in 2025.

Internet of Things has successfully dribbled into all aspects of business and is shaping all industry sectors. From education, retail, healthcare, automobile to entertainment.

With IoT entering the waste management industry, future of recycling looks promising.

With RFID and sensor technology, recycling and waste management systems can be further optimized to increase productivity and save costs while moving to a more sustainable future.

IoT enabled applications are effectively improving the waste management operations. Pre-defined routes, outdated methods of waste collection are increasingly being replaced with sensor-enabled bins and sophisticated waste management applications.

Using Data to Recycle Products

One of the salient features of any IoT enable application is its ability of send and receive data in real-time.  This data is used for a multitude of applications. With connected devices and cloud-based applications in order, the waste management chain is becoming ubiquitous with multiple points of interaction.

Image Source: American Trash Management APM Plan at Lumina (201 Folsom, SF) in San Francisco

Through sensor enabled intelligent technology, dustbins, and garbage cans can be connected to the Internet as a “Digital Bin or Can”. As an “Internet of Product”, these can be monitored, supervised and managed by identifying fill levels with every waste dumping.

For instance, once someone empties waste into the smart bin or IoT enabled garbage can, they can scan the code on that bin which can immediately send data to the waste collector.

This data leverages collectors to identify the level and quantity of waste to be recycled. It can also be used to further optimize logistic operations like what size of the vehicle should be used, which routes to follow, which garbage be collected later and so on. The possibilities are both endless and promising.

Case Study: Capturing Data on the Internet to Manage Waste on Ground

Numerous challenges plague the waste management supply-chain today. One such challenge involves sticking to pre-defined routes irrespective of whether the bins are full to the brim or not.

UK based ISB Global is using IoT powered applications to manage waste. Using advanced bin-level sensors, cloud-based data collection and a smart app, ISB has created a network of connected devices for effective waste management.

 

By applying technologies like sensors, geo-location tracking, Bluetooth beacons and automatic location sensing, ISB aims to maximize productivity and deliver great service at lower costs.

These systems also capture data such as weight, volume, costs, truck number, and feed all the information back which can further automate billing and invoicing operations.

These solutions are ideal for waste management companies or bigger venues like malls, restaurants, schools or hospitals, where bins move around and need to move back to their designated location.

But are we overlooking something larger?

Role of Consumers in the Connected World

Though waste management technologies are nascent, there has been an upsurge in IoT based waste management solutions and companies. Big players are deploying sensor robust management systems to match a timely, need-based approach towards waste management.

But this is just the beginning.

Talking about effective waste management, consider a scenario.

You keep using batteries to power devices in everyday life. Batteries are making their way into our transport and vehicles too. What happens when a battery is done? You toss it in the bin. Right?

Is that efficient or ideal?

Imagine if you could digitally represent all these batteries on a serial level using an Internet of Things Platform without the involvement of sensors. Simply a digital record of each battery accessible on the internet. Once your battery is waste, you could use your phone to scan and activate the IOT record for that battery, updating the record to say the battery is done and you need a new one tagging it with the current geolocation.

The manufacturer can now deliver a new battery if requested and schedule a pick-up of the used one along with all the other batteries that day who have lit up on their monitor asking to be picked up for recycling. These can now be properly recycled by the manufacturer to make and deliver new batteries turning the whole process into a much more sustainable, resource efficient process with the help of IOT.

By brands taking the responsibility to create the IoT infrastructure and involving the consumers on a large scale, effective recycling procedures can be implemented which benefits everyone.

From companies to customers, an all stakeholders approach can provide sustainable solutions across the globe.

These applications can be used for a number of higher value product categories like electronics, appliances, consumer durables, furniture, hardware and more where products can simply be flagged for recycling by the consumer and the manufacturer can recycle the materials to create new units rather than procure or mine more precious metals, manufacture more plastic or raw material.

When manufacturers think beyond the use of sensors and consider the potential of an Internet of Things Platform on which they can build smarter applications, efficiency increases, productivity increases and smarter more sustainable models are born.

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