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IoT Enabled Asset Tracking

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#3 IoT Enabled Asset Tracking

 

Asset Tracking is the method used by businesses to keep a record of their company’s physical assets and its data. Depending on the business, a physical asset can mean different things i.e. IT devices, equipment, fleets…etc. Regardless of the industry, having constant secure tracking of the location and health of every valuable asset is critical for business operations.

 

Asset Tracking has evolved through many phases to what it encompasses today. In the previous years, manual counting at the end of the day of their inventory was the only way for businesses to know the number of units sold and which remained. This process was time-consuming and prone to errors like inaccuracy. Following this was the Punch Card system where every item was represented by a different pattern of small hoes then plugged into the computer, this method was not used for a long time as it was deemed to be expensive, slow and incapable of keeping up with the business’ workflow efficiency.

 

After the punch card system, the barcode system was developed. Most people of this generation are familiar with this system of lines that contain information of different items. Many companies adopted this system, as it continued to develop and improve over the years, however, it only tracked items, doesn’t allow integration of product information into a computer.

 

 

“As technology advances, and the Internet of Things (IoT) slowly permeates every industry, proving that digital transformation is key to business success,” it’s without a doubt that there would be an integration between IoT and Asset Tracking Management, not only that but it would be at the core of how successful businesses are at modernizing their operations.

 

“By collecting and analyzing data from mobile assets, businesses can find efficiencies, ensure asset visibility and increase revenues. For example, IoT-enabled asset tracking can be used to monitor the progress of shipments and ensure that they arrive on time. If shipments are delayed, data can be used to determine where the disruptions occur, and businesses can act to address the issue. Asset tracking also allows businesses to monitor damage, theft, and loss of assets that are on the move. Asset tracking solutions are being used by all types of businesses, ranging from manufacturers and fleet managers to car-sharing companies, to improve customer experience, keeps assets secure and increase revenue.”

 

 

Introducing GCR Cloud solution: Asset Tracking by Trackrover

 

A combination of sensors on assets and indoor locators ensures that you have a real-time tracking of your mobile and immobile assets. Trackrover’s TrackSafe IoT Platform allows you to do just that; the IoT platform is fairly new in terms of technology and implementations, there are several competing technologies

  1. BLE Based (Bluetooth Low Energy)
  2. RFID Based
  3. LoRa and Signet

 

Our solution is an independent platform with BLE tags. The platform is extensible itself and can be easily integrated with 2 & 3, but because the advantage of RFID is that the tags are cheap but gateways to it are extremely expensive especially if an object is to be scanned at a distance and most phones do not have RFID capabilities. Whereas Lora and Signet are being touted as the next generation IoT networks, however, a backbone is to be provided by an MSP, BLE, on the other hand, uses Wi-Fi as the backhaul.

 

 

Product features:

  • Indoor & outdoor tracking
  • Temperature & humidity alerts & alarms
  • Zone Monitoring
  • Data Entry & Analytics

 

About GCR - 100+ best IoT solutions and cloud services 
For more information can visit us at:

GCR Knowledge Center
GCR Global Website

posted Jan 3 by Gcr Gcr

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0 votes

Contemporary fashion is undergoing a transformation.

We are increasingly witnessing all industry sectors shift towards the digital. And fashion is no stranger to technology.

Counterfeiting has become a global menace. We have already discussed how IoT is helping companies like HP fight counterfeiting.

But the fashion industry is trickier.

Counterfeiting and fake products manufacturing are higher in the fashion industry given the availability of knock-offs of big brands at cheaper prices. As a result, apparel gets even more challenging to authenticate thanks to the increasing sophistication of manufacturing products that can pass off as originals. There are many people donning fake LVs (Louis Vuitton) and MKs (Michael Kors) all around the world. Some customers even get duped and end up purchasing fake products for very real prices. Moreover, the rise of e-commerce websites has multiplied the scale of the problem.

As per the OECD, 2.5 percent of all imports account for counterfeited products, out of which, the US, Italian and French brands are hit the worst. Worth nearly half a trillion dollars per year, profits recovered from the counterfeiting of goods are further used to organize other crimes according to the report by OECD and the EU’s Intellectual Property Office.

With efforts taken by industry leaders to trademark products, many are now integrating technology to further help customers and retailers authenticate products.

Chanel and LV Authentication Labels

The rise in fake products and counterfeiting has provoked big brands to fight back. Chanel places hologram stickers with unique serial numbers in the lining of its handbags while Louis Vuitton has ‘date codes’ to validate authentic LV products.

 

Succumbing to authentication methods pertaining to the 70’s and 80’s may not be feasible in a world where technology allows sophisticated counterfeiting and manufacture of fake products.

 

What is required is an IoT approach towards authenticating these merchandising products.

Toronto based Authentic or Not believes every product needs an ID. By embedding their microchips in apparel and other merchandising brands, Authentic or Not claims to bridge the gap between technology and fashion. Their microchips are designed specifically to withstand washing and dry-cleaning conditions, integrating fashion and IoT. And hovering a smartphone in front of microchips-embedded clothes can verify their authenticity.

IoT Enabled Clothing can help authenticate products and Fight Counterfeiting (Source: Authentic or Not)

This is only one of the use-cases for incorporating IoT into fashion. What is interesting to note here, is that products do not necessarily need a ‘microchip’ to participate in the Internet of Things. They can do so without one.

When we talked about ‘Everyday Shirts on the Internet’, we explained the relevance of ‘pseudo-connected’ devices and things that can also be a part of this trend. By allocating a unique identifier to products that cannot directly connect to the internet, they become eligible to participate in the Internet of Products.

QR codes, RFIDs, and other unique product identifiers to build a brand’s product directory such as barcodes or other two-dimensional code labels can be used. These technologies are also not very expensive to deploy on all products, whereas a microchip on every product can be more feasible for higher value luxury fashion products.

Scannable and readable physical product markers can potentially IoT enable clothing and other merchandising like handbags, sunglasses, watches, shoes etc. Maintaining a digital record of fashion products allows customers and retailers to quickly run a check on the internet against these authentication labels.

These physical markers can be checked against the brands’ product data directory or centralized product IoT inventory. Brands can utilize and leverage this user-product data to enable other features like warranty management as well.

As a result, it makes it tougher for counterfeits to replicate and sell fake products.

IoT Platforms have the potential to drastically intervene and transform the billion-dollar counterfeit industry. With lack of Intellectual property rights to safeguard products, high-end fashion and merchandising brands need to deploy IoT technologies internally. Brands can implement similar technologies to fight back counterfeiting and fake products by building ‘smart products or by simply connecting them to the internet.

 

     

+3 votes

Contemporary fashion is undergoing a transformation.

We are increasingly witnessing all industry sectors shift towards the digital. And fashion is no stranger to technology.

Counterfeiting has become a global menace. We have already discussed how IoT is helping companies like HP fight counterfeiting.

But the fashion industry is trickier.

Counterfeiting and fake products manufacturing are higher in the fashion industry given the availability of knock-offs of big brands at cheaper prices. As a result, apparel gets even more challenging to authenticate thanks to the increasing sophistication of manufacturing products that can pass off as originals. There are many people donning fake LVs (Louis Vuitton) and MKs (Michael Kors) all around the world. Some customers even get duped and end up purchasing fake products for very real prices. Moreover, the rise of e-commerce websites has multiplied the scale of the problem.

As per the OECD, 2.5 percent of all imports account for counterfeited products, out of which, the US, Italian and French brands are hit the worst. Worth nearly half a trillion dollars per year, profits recovered from the counterfeiting of goods are further used to organize other crimes according to the report by OECD and the EU’s Intellectual Property Office.

With efforts taken by industry leaders to trademark products, many are now integrating technology to further help customers and retailers authenticate products.

Chanel and LV Authentication Labels

The rise in fake products and counterfeiting has provoked big brands to fight back. Chanel places hologram stickers with unique serial numbers in the lining of its handbags while Louis Vuitton has ‘date codes’ to validate authentic LV products.

 

Succumbing to authentication methods pertaining to the 70’s and 80’s may not be feasible in a world where technology allows sophisticated counterfeiting and manufacture of fake products.

 

What is required is an IoT approach towards authenticating these merchandising products.

Toronto based Authentic or Not believes every product needs an ID. By embedding their microchips in apparel and other merchandising brands, Authentic or Not claims to bridge the gap between technology and fashion. Their microchips are designed specifically to withstand washing and dry-cleaning conditions, integrating fashion and IoT. And hovering a smartphone in front of microchips-embedded clothes can verify their authenticity.

IoT Enabled Clothing can help authenticate products and Fight Counterfeiting (Source: Authentic or Not)

This is only one of the use-cases for incorporating IoT into fashion. What is interesting to note here, is that products do not necessarily need a ‘microchip’ to participate in the Internet of Things. They can do so without one.

When we talked about ‘Everyday Shirts on the Internet’, we explained the relevance of ‘pseudo-connected’ devices and things that can also be a part of this trend. By allocating a unique identifier to products that cannot directly connect to the internet, they become eligible to participate in the Internet of Products.

QR codes, RFIDs, and other unique product identifiers to build a brand’s product directory such as barcodes or other two-dimensional code labels can be used. These technologies are also not very expensive to deploy on all products, whereas a microchip on every product can be more feasible for higher value luxury fashion products.

Scannable and readable physical product markers can potentially IoT enable clothing and other merchandising like handbags, sunglasses, watches, shoes etc. Maintaining a digital record of fashion products allows customers and retailers to quickly run a check on the internet against these authentication labels.

These physical markers can be checked against the brands’ product data directory or centralized product IoT inventory. Brands can utilize and leverage this user-product data to enable other features like warranty management as well.

As a result, it makes it tougher for counterfeits to replicate and sell fake products.

IoT Platforms have the potential to drastically intervene and transform the billion-dollar counterfeit industry. With lack of Intellectual property rights to safeguard products, high-end fashion and merchandising brands need to deploy IoT technologies internally. Brands can implement similar technologies to fight back counterfeiting and fake products by building ‘smart products or by simply connecting them to the internet.

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First Published on Qliktag's Website

 

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